Software Development

Heuristics for Assessing Computational Archival Science (CAS) Research: The Case of the Human Face of Big Data Project

Computational Archival Science (CAS) has been proposed as a trans-disciplinary field that combines computational and archival thinking. To provide grounded evidence, a foundational paper explored eight initial themes that constitute potential building blocks. In order for a CAS community to emerge, further studies are needed to test this framework. While the foundational paper for CAS provides a conceptual and theoretical basis of this new field, there is still a need to articulate useful guidelines and checkpoints that validate a CAS research agenda.

Cycle Atlanta: Seeing Like a Bike

The Cycle Atlanta project aims at creating sensor systems that allow a bike to "see" its environment and collect data as a participatory effort so that we can help the City of Atlanta to make informed decisions about biking infrastructures. Specifically, a sensor box equipped with sonars, lidars, PM sensors, gas sensors, gyroscope, accelerometer, and others was developed to detect environmental factors that can give rise to bicyclers' stress level. I participated in this project as a Data Science for Social Good (Atlanta's DSSG) Summer fellow in 2017.

Human Face of Big Data

This project aims to build a map-based platform that can be used in presenting historical documents of the nation-wide, urban renewal project in 1960's and 70's to provide easy-to-use interfaces that can be used by former residents, archivists, reserachrs, and citizens; and ultimately to reconstruct a virtual neighborhood where people can share their memories.

Mapping Inequality

Over the past 4 years, teams of archivists have digitized portions of National Archives RG195: General Records of the Home Owners’ Loan Corporation [HOLC]. The records include surveys, memorandums, and maps of American neighborhoods in the 1930’s. Now that the records are available digitally, students and faculty members are working to curate the collection and “data-fy” the information contained within. This involves extracting text from digitized 75 year old records, designing queryable databases to house the information, and disseminating the information so it is publically accessible.

MapReduce Framework for Swarm Robot Systems

This was a part of research projects conducted under the Basic Research Laboratory Grant from Ministry of Education, Science, and Technology in South Korea. This project is two folds: (1) simulating an application of swarm robot systems; (2) designing a software framework for the swarm robot systems to reduce the complexity of developing applications while minimizing the amount of tranismitted data by adopting MapReduce paradigm. The video above is a simulation of a swarm robot system applicatoin that searches for red pillars (foraging).

Image Retrieval Systems based on Color Similarity and Edge Detection

This project was conducted in 2008 for my bachelor's thesis in the department of Electrical Engineering at Seoul National University (it was more like a capston project rather than a thesis, since the focus of the project was mainly at implementing algorithms rather than analyzing the performance of algorithms using concrete measures, e.g., recall and precision). I implemented an image retrieval system prototype that takes an image as input, and outputs most similar images from the image database.

Open Data Impact Map

The Center for Open Data Enterprise is a non-profit organization that aims to maximize the value of open data as a public resource that anyone can use. As a means to promote the impact and value of using open data, the center designed and developed the Open Data Impact map. As a Data Science & Technology Fellow at the Center for Open Data Enterprise, I have worked on the Open Data Impact Map, which is a searchable, centralized database of open data use cases from around the world. The map shows the distribution of organizations in the world that make use of open data.

Wireless Price Display System

This project was my final team project for "Electrical Engineering Laboratory 3" class in 2004 (when I was junior in college). The goal was to make a wireless system that substitutes price tags with electrical displays in grocery stores. The base station manages a list of products in the database, and it sends out price information to receiver units. Receiver units are simple character displays having unique IDs. When any products' prices change, the system can easily update new prices on these displays. 

Drupal Course Management Module for UMD Websites

This project was designed to provide most up-to-date courses information to University of Maryland College of Arts and Humanities (ARHU) websites. Since most ARHU websites were implemented with Drupal (Content Management System), a Drupal module was developed to migrate the university's course catalogs into Drupal databases. For crawling the course catalogs, Brady Law (CS student)'s Python scripts were modified and re-implemented.

Development of a VoIP Testing Program

Skype's SILK codec was tested as an exploratory project to see if there was an opportunity to integrate real-time audio communication to smart TVs. This project was conducted as an internship project in LG Electronics' LCD TV Research Lab in 2010. Siwon Yang (currently developer at Hyundai Mobis) and I implemented a VoIP testing program on Linux using C and SLIK codec APIs. The video is a demo of the testing program.

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