Web Application

Toward Identifying Values and Tensions in Designing a Historically-Sensitive Data Platform: A Case of the Urban Renewal Project

Urban renewal was a national initiative from 1950s through 70s aimed at improving so-called “blighted” areas, and resulted in the displacement of many vibrant communities. While the underlying mechanisms of urban renewal have been examined, there have been very few data-driven, evidence-based studies that take into account the histories and interests of former residents. The “Human Face of Big Data” project started as a digital curation effort to design and develop a web-based, big data platform that provides insights and analytics into the mechanisms of this process.

Heuristics for Assessing Computational Archival Science (CAS) Research: The Case of the Human Face of Big Data Project

Computational Archival Science (CAS) has been proposed as a trans-disciplinary field that combines computational and archival thinking. To provide grounded evidence, a foundational paper explored eight initial themes that constitute potential building blocks. In order for a CAS community to emerge, further studies are needed to test this framework. While the foundational paper for CAS provides a conceptual and theoretical basis of this new field, there is still a need to articulate useful guidelines and checkpoints that validate a CAS research agenda.

A Tool for Estimating and Visualizing Poverty Maps

"Poverty maps" are designed to simultaneously display the spatial distribution of welfare and different dimensions of poverty determinants. The plotting of such information on maps heavily relies on data that is collected through infrequent national household surveys and censuses. However, due to the high cost associated with this type of data collection process, poverty maps are often inaccurate in capturing the current deprivation status.

Human Face of Big Data

This project aims to build a map-based platform that can be used in presenting historical documents of the nation-wide, urban renewal project in 1960's and 70's to provide easy-to-use interfaces that can be used by former residents, archivists, reserachrs, and citizens; and ultimately to reconstruct a virtual neighborhood where people can share their memories.

Mapping Inequality

Over the past 4 years, teams of archivists have digitized portions of National Archives RG195: General Records of the Home Owners’ Loan Corporation [HOLC]. The records include surveys, memorandums, and maps of American neighborhoods in the 1930’s. Now that the records are available digitally, students and faculty members are working to curate the collection and “data-fy” the information contained within. This involves extracting text from digitized 75 year old records, designing queryable databases to house the information, and disseminating the information so it is publically accessible.

Open Data Impact Map

The Center for Open Data Enterprise is a non-profit organization that aims to maximize the value of open data as a public resource that anyone can use. As a means to promote the impact and value of using open data, the center designed and developed the Open Data Impact map. As a Data Science & Technology Fellow at the Center for Open Data Enterprise, I have worked on the Open Data Impact Map, which is a searchable, centralized database of open data use cases from around the world. The map shows the distribution of organizations in the world that make use of open data.

Drupal Course Management Module for UMD Websites

This project was designed to provide most up-to-date courses information to University of Maryland College of Arts and Humanities (ARHU) websites. Since most ARHU websites were implemented with Drupal (Content Management System), a Drupal module was developed to migrate the university's course catalogs into Drupal databases. For crawling the course catalogs, Brady Law (CS student)'s Python scripts were modified and re-implemented.

"I know where that is": Cultural Differences in Perception of New Places

This research project had been conducted for my master's thesis (Master of Information Management degree). I conceptualized cultual background with Hall's high- and low-context culture (1976) and tried to see whether people's perceptions of urban places vary between physical addresses and symbolic representations of spaces (landmarks), when their cultural backgrounds were different. A survey questionnaire was used to measure cultural background, and a web-based online game was used to measure people's perceptions of places.